Tag Archives: kindle

Book Review: The Silent Corner

The Silent Corner fits into that rarest category of books – the literary thriller – and introduces readers to Jane Hawk, a strong female protagonist thrust into a good vs. evil fight against overwhelming odds.

If the product description feels like a rehash of past Dean Koontz books – hero faces off against Big Brother, End of Times, and Shadow Government conspiracies – well, you’re not wrong. But while those familiar themes are present, they are not unoriginal.

In The Silent Corner, Hawk, who is on extended leave from the FBI after her husband commits suicide, discovers that nano-technology is being used to systematically eliminate a segment of the population that doesn’t share the world view of a few powerful people bent on shaping the future according to their ideals.

Koontz is, as usual, observant and insightful with regard to the current state of affairs in the world – and he creates a story with purpose and meaning that goes far deeper than entertainment.

In her journey to face-off with the man responsible for her husband’s death, Hawk encounters a series of like-minded individuals and behind the scene heroes who not only help her but also give her hope. It’s not just good storytelling. It’s also allegorical, and what I believe Koontz wishes for his readers.

This is an amazing book. It’s an edge-of-your-seat mile-a-minute thriller that’s written by a master storyteller at the top of his game.

I highly recommend it for fans of mystery, thriller and literary fiction.

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Book Review: The Prisoner

“better safe than headless”

I’m on Alex Berenson’s email list, and when he sent a message to his readers that John Wells was “back undercover in the Muslim world” I immediately went to Amazon and pre-ordered.

I was excited, but also a little worried.

Wells is a great character. Berenson is an incredibly gifted writer. But of late, a number of usually reliable thriller authors have used the Jack Bauer “24” method of going undercover with disastrous consequences (e.g. I have serious reservations about buying any future Scot Harvath books). I felt Berenson was right on target with his idea – I can’t imagine any fan of John Wells not wanting to read about him going undercover in Afghanistan for a second time – but I feared the worst, that Wells would morph into a bad superhero caricature and Berenson would have ruined a great series.

Now that I’ve read the book, I apologize to Mr. Berenson – sorry I doubted you. This is the best post-9/11 thriller I’ve ever read. In fact, it might be the best thriller I’ve ever read, period.

It begins with a CIA mission in ISIS territory. Hence, this great line from one of the operators: “better safe than headless.” After the mission, it’s clear that someone is giving sensitive intelligence to ISIS. Shafer and Wells – with support from President Duto – launch a bold plan to uncover the mole, and what unfolds is nothing short of mesmerizing.

Berenson takes readers on a vivid, surreal journey with pacing and prose that are masterfully executed and a plot that is all too real and terrifying. Berenson has clearly been to Afghanistan and the other dangerous / exotic locales used in the book – for no one could carry a reader down this path so well unless he first traveled it himself.

The book builds to a frenetic pace, and then Berenson cranks it up even more as it turns into a race against the clock to stop ISIS from carrying out an attack that rivals 9/11.

If you enjoy thrillers, read this book. If you really enjoy thrillers that also fall into the “literary” category, then you absolutely need to be reading Alex Berenson. I used to say no one writes that category better than Daniel Silva, but I think Berenson is at the top now.

Read this book – I highly recommend it, 5/5 stars.

Use this affiliate link to read more about The Prisoner on Amazon.

From the Fields to the Garden II: “Killer”

The best new book of the holiday season for MMA and boxing fans is From the Fields to the Garden II: A second chapter in the life story of legendary cutman Jacob “Stitch” Duran.

In a few days, I’ll be posting an exclusive interview with Stitch.

Here’s an exciting excerpt from the book — with special thanks to Stitch and co-author Zac Robinson for permission to post it on my blog.


“Killer”

We made our way through Camp Morehead and chatted with almost everyone there. One young man asked me if I ever heard of Danny “Little Red” Lopez, WBC Featherweight champion. Of course I had. “He was a great Latin fighter in the ‘70s and ‘80s,” I said.

Turns out, Danny Lopez was his grandfather. I could see the pride in his eyes knowing that I remembered him. Moments like these are what made our tour special because we were able to give these American Heroes some positive memories.

Another great story while in Bagram happened at the chow hall. I was sitting next to a soldier from Poland. He said, “Stitch, you know, I studied Brazilian jujitsu and that has given me the calming effect to accept death. As I hear these bullets buzzing by me, I tell myself, if I go, I am taking you with me.”

Strong words from a soldier that was there as part of the coalition. I was mesmerized by his comment. What mental strength these soldiers have to have in order to survive in the battlefield.

Another time, Amir, Jake and I were walking around the market on base. A soldier from Croatia recognized us and wanted to take a photo. We took one, and then he turned to Jake and Amir, “No offense to you guys, but I want to take a picture with Stitch.”

I guess he recognized me wrapping the hands and working the corners of Mirko “Cro Cop” Filipovic, the famous MMA fighter from his home country. As we had our arms around each other and ready for a photo, he glanced up at me and said, “I’m not a fighter. I’m a killer.”

I believed him. These soldiers deal with life and death on a regular basis.

By the end of the tour we were all feeling quite important as we flew from base to base in Blackhawks. Our next visit was NKC, which is the home to ISAF. ISAF is a NATO-led security mission. I felt like I was in the movie Blackhawk Down as we closed in on our destination. The compound is located in Kabul. Once again, we flew over the area and I kept my eyes open looking for any unusual movement. I did have the complete confidence in the gunners, but I couldn’t keep myself from scanning the ground.

Our scheduled landing was in the center of a soccer field, and there was a game going on as the choppers approached. The athletes ran to a safe place before the two Blackhawks landed and blew dust everywhere.

When we approached the field, armed guards rushed to their positions and ushered us into a safe place where we would meet and greet with soldiers who came to support us.

I’d wrapped so many hands by now, but I saved enough tape and gauze to wrap the hands of a couple soldiers who had covered our backs throughout the tour. It was my way of showing them my respect and appreciation for taking care of us.

One was Major Hood, a man who took pride in his uniform and was the one who made things happen for us. He always kept a stern face, so I made it my goal to make him smile. I gave him the knockout wrap, and we posed for a picture with both of us smiling.

Working with so many fighters in the past, I have learned how to read their eyes. Eyes say everything! Sergeant Perkins was one of these fighters. He’d been with us during the whole tour. He had seen me wrap dozens of soldiers’ hands. He walked up to me with his M-16 hanging over his shoulder. “Can I ask you a question,” he sheepishly asked.

I knew what he wanted and beat him to the punch. I stopped him in the middle of his question. “I would be honored to wrap your hands.”

I did wrap his hands, and this became one of those special memories from my trip. These two soldiers gave us everything they had and that was a small way for me to thank them.

We finished the stay at ISAF when the staff ran flags up the pole. Each flag was used during a combat mission. Together, we folded them in military style and then they were gifted to us as a token of their appreciation.

It was such an honor to receive the flags.

The Blackhawks had arrived earlier than scheduled to pick us up and take us back to Bagram. The fear of being parked too long in the middle of the soccer field was a major concern because of incoming mortars. We had to cut our tour short and rush to the two Blackhawks.

As we ran towards the choppers, it was dark and all the lights were off. Despite being there for over a week, from time to time I still slipped into civilian mode. We strapped in, and during the lift off I decided I wanted to take a photo of the gunner manning his 50-caliber machine gun. I realized that our tour was basically over, and I think a part of me wanted to hold onto it. I gave it no thought and made a huge mistake by taking the photo. Both gunners had their night vision goggles on. The flash screwed up their night vision. Though I could not see his eyes, his body language said it all.

The lights were off because of the fear of having incoming directed at the two choppers. At that moment I recognized what a dumb thing I just did. I’d screwed up their vision for a few moments, and even worse, I could have given our position away. With my headphones on and listening to Santana, I just sat there like a little kid, punished for screwing up. Thankfully, we were able to fly out of there without incident.

“Explosion”

Another incredible part of our trip was when we got to meet USMC four-star General Joseph “Fighting Joe” Dunford who at the time was Commandant of the Marine Corps International Security Force. As of writing, he is Chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff. You don’t get much higher than that.

He was at Camp Phoenix for a ceremony where the base was changing hands from one General to another. Security was extremely high because of all the dignitaries present. I could see guards on rooftops and around the perimeter of the event.

After the ceremony, we were invited to meet the General. At the party, there was a long line of officers waiting to meet him. We picked a place to wait, loaded our plates with food, and chatted with some of the guests.

Soon we were escorted to the front of the line where we met and talked to General Dunford. Our presence there meant so much to the troops’ morale that the General thanked us personally for taking the time to visit. We finished by taking pictures with him and many others.

During our three-day stay at Camp Phoenix, we had a chance to relax a bit, see the base, and spend time with the troops. Goze also managed to get enough of a strong signal to host MMAJunkie live. I’m sure it’s the only MMA show to ever be live from Camp Phoenix.

On our last day in Bagram, we had some free time. While Jake was shopping at the market by the entrance to the base, there was a huge car explosion. Jake ran back to meet with us near the bunkers, and said he felt the blast and the tin roofs of the market were shaking and rattling.

Sergeant Perkins and his team immediately assembled. They were the first responders and quickly reported to the scene. It turned out that the explosion had killed something like ten people. It doesn’t make sense to me. One moment people are walking around shopping, and the next they are killed in an explosion. It just isn’t fair.

We were relieved to see the team come back safe. We asked Sergeant Perkins what happened. He simply replied with, “The Special Forces have neutralized the situation.”

I don’t know what that exactly meant, but knowing the capability of the Special Forces I understood that it didn’t look good for the bad guys.

We had met some wonderful people on our tour, and our sendoff was an unexpected surprise. A group of supporters that we had hung out with had set up a festive area leading up to the flight line with lights and music. They had learned that I was a big Santana fan, so they had his music playing in the background. We hugged everyone that came to say good-bye and thanked them for having such a wonderful time.

With flak vest and helmets on, we boarded the C-17 with hundreds of soldiers who had finished their tours in Afghanistan, and headed back to Manas. We were proud to be flying home with these heroes and looking forward to our two beers and watching the Cain Velasquez/Junior Dos Santos fight with them.

We all assembled at the main Rec Center/bar to see the fights. It was a festive night as the soldiers enjoyed their two beers.

UFC 166 was held at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, and transmitted to all the Armed Forces worldwide. What a night of fights. The one that stole the show was Gilbert Melendez vs. Diego Sanchez. I’d worked with both fighters, so I knew it was going to be a barnburner, and it was. Gilbert won the decision in an all-out battle. After that, Daniel Cormier took a decision over Roy Nelson setting up the main event.

That fight left no question that Cain Velasquez was indeed a true Mexican warrior. He stopped Dos Santos in a grueling fight that had Cain connecting on 274 total strikes to Junior’s 62. The punishment that Dos Santos took was hard to watch as his face turned into a swollen mess.

It was a huge win for Cain, as it was almost two years earlier when dos Santos had taken the belt from him at Fox’s debut event in Anaheim.

It was a high-energy night that we finished by taking pictures with the soldiers. It was a nice way to end our trip.

After eleven days on tour, we would be returning home with a new respect for the men and women in uniform. They sacrifice their lives so that we can live in a free nation.

Months later, our newfound friend and now brother, Jim “Silverback” Mahurin, attended our annual MMAJunkie gathering in Las Vegas. With approval from Lieutenant Colonel Moses, he surprised George, Goze, and I with a (CIB) Combat Infantryman’s Badge that is worn by soldiers who have seen combat. In front of all the MMAJunkie family, we proudly received our pins. Along with my Autism pin, I proudly wear my CIB pin on my cornerman jacket in honor of the men and women we met and all the men and women who fight for our country.

***

Use this Amazon affiliate link to pre-order From the Fields to the Garden II for Kindle.

Book Review: The Black Widow

If there was any doubt as to whether or not Daniel Silva is the best contemporary writer of literary thrillers, then The Black Widow should resolve the debate. The plot is intricate and multilayered, while the prose is as lyrical as a classic novel – add Silva’s grasp of the difficult terrorism related issues facing the world today and this book is a phenomenal achievement.

The story begins with a terrorist attack by ISIS on a Jewish center in Paris. It’s reminiscent of the recent terror attacks in France and Belgium. In response, Gabriel Allon and the Mossad work with the Jordanians and the French to infiltrate a network set up by the Islamic State.

The first two-thirds of the book is centered on the recruitment and training of the agent, and ultimately the operation itself. The final third of the book is non-stop, edge-of-your-seat thriller as Allon and his colleagues try to prevent an ISIS attack on American soil.

In the author’s note at the end of the book, Silva writes, “The Black Widow is a work of entertainment and should be read as nothing more.” However, he also adds that he “did my utmost to explain the roots and explosive growth of ISIS accurately and dispassionately.”

Silva is right on both accounts. You can simply read and enjoy this as a literary thriller, but you can also look to it as a primer on ISIS. It presents a clear and accurate picture of how ISIS evolved and why it is so dangerous. And finally, with his fiction, Silva offers a vivid, horrifying scenario for what could happen in the U.S. if our leaders are unwilling or unable to deal with this plague.

I highly recommend this book for thriller/literary fiction/political readers: 5/5 stars. Use this affiliate link to read more about The Black Widow on Amazon.

Book Review: Ghosts of War

This book literally begins with the ending of the last title in the series – “The Forgotten Soldier” – but you don’t need to have read any of the previous books to enjoy this one. The plot is similar in some respects to recent books by Alex Berenson and Mark Greaney – a few bad actors manipulate world events to try and lure the United States into a war.

In this case, the Secretary of State is dead (the ending to the last book), the Taskforce is sidelined to avoid being exposed in the fallout, and now Russia is advancing across Europe and our NATO allies are at risk – but then an even greater tragedy strikes America’s government.

This title is very different from the others in the series. The stakes are as high as ever, but this isn’t about the Taskforce chasing down bad individuals – it’s a book about war. And Brad Taylor writes it exceptionally well. Taylor is also more nuanced on the political side than in his previous works, which adds a layer of complexity to his characters.

This is a definite must-read for thriller/war novel fans: 5/5 stars.

Use this affiliate link to see Ghosts of War on Amazon.

I received a free digital edition courtesy Penguin Random House First to Read in exchange for an honest/unbiased review.

 

Book Review: Back Blast

I have read and enjoyed this entire series and there is no question that Mark Greaney is a terrific thriller writer—however, this book is a major disappointment.

The premise is that Court Gentry, who has been on the run from the CIA for years, has finally returned to U.S. soil to try and clear his name. This has been building of course for the entire series, and I was looking forward to reading Back Blast to get all the answers about why Gentry had been targeted by the CIA.

Three things bothered me about this book:

It’s length—at 500-plus pages there is way too much nonsensical filler that completely derailed the pace and flow. If the story had been 100 pages shorter then the writing would have been much stronger and enjoyable.

The action bordered on absurdity. In fairness it’s what you expect from a series where the main character is on the run from CIA assassins in every book—but the way he evades his pursuers has become more and more ridiculous. In the past it’s been smart and the violence was in clever, tech-savvy ways. In Back Blast it did nothing but frustrate me.

The last and biggest problem I have with the book is the actual answer as to why Gentry has been on the run all these years. I won’t reveal any spoilers, but suffice it to say the motivations and actions of the people pursuing Gentry and the final resolution were major letdowns after all the time invested in reading this series.

I feel like most longtime fans of the series will want to read it anyway—and I’ll definitely read the next installment because I am a big fan of Mark Greaney—but I don’t think I would recommend Back Blast to anyone. Instead I would suggest the earlier books in the series. They’re much, much better.

I received a free digital edition from Penguin Random House First to Read in exchange for a honest/unbiased review. Use this affiliate link to read more about Back Blast on Amazon.

Book Review: The Forgotten Soldier

For the first half of the book I thought Brad Taylor had finally lost his momentum with this series. The plot is basically a rehash of a theme that rears its head in nearly every Taskforce book—that an extralegal organization, no matter how well intended, will ultimately betray its mandate by exceeding / abusing its authority.

In this instance, a member of the Taskforce goes rogue after his brother is killed in Afghanistan. The first half of the book is a lot of debate, and it did nothing to develop the plot. If anything, the actions of Pike and his team in past books is inconsistent with the outrage regarding the rogue Taskforce member in this book—but even ignoring that, the first half of the book felt like a disaster for the series.

And then out of nowhere there is a scene with Jennifer that blew me away. It’s a little past the midway point, and the rest of the book is non-stop, frenetic, adrenaline fueled Brad Taylor at his absolute best. The plot takes a turn, and the debate and slow build-up in the first half of the book turn out to be incredibly relevant—and by the time you turn the last page it’s one of the most satisfying thrillers you’re likely to read this year.

I love this series, love this book, and can’t wait for the next one: 5/5 stars.

I received a free digital edition from Penguin Random House First to Read in exchange for a honest/unbiased review. Use this affiliate link to read more about The Forgotten Soldier on Amazon.